Callie cooke

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Callie cooke

As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc.

Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc.

We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption.

We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Post code. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. Still, always good to see Ollie. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. Here is the trailer:.

Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends.

Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me.

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Callie cooke

Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so.

Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. Post code. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. Still, always good to see Ollie. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. All of the performers were very good indeed.

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. All of the performers were very good indeed. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Still, always good to see Ollie. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no.

This production is well worth seeing. All of the performers were very good indeed. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse.

Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. This production is well worth seeing. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short.

As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. Post code. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse.

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Callie cooke

As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Still, always good to see Ollie. This production is well worth seeing.

In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. View Post. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted.

As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business.

We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. Here is the trailer:. Still, always good to see Ollie. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans.

Post code. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives.

We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb.

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Callie cooke

Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. Here is the trailer:. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us.

Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team.

But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs.

Still, always good to see Ollie. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. Post code. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. View Post. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking.

The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia.

View Post. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. This production is well worth seeing. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team.

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Callie cooke

View Post. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. Post code. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Here is the trailer:. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed.

Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three.

Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again.

Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. All of the performers were very good indeed. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. This production is well worth seeing.

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. This production is well worth seeing. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption.

Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. Still, always good to see Ollie.

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Callie cooke

Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. This production is well worth seeing. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff.

The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. All of the performers were very good indeed. View Post. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three.

Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting.

But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. This production is well worth seeing. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. All of the performers were very good indeed. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted.

Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Post code. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs.

I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team.

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Callie cooke

All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up.

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary.

We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. View Post. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me.

Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Post code. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Here is the trailer:. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that.

As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no.

Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. Still, always good to see Ollie. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three.

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Callie cooke

Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse.

The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted.

In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends.

Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Here is the trailer:. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. Still, always good to see Ollie. This production is well worth seeing. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed.

Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. All of the performers were very good indeed. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. This production is well worth seeing. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Here is the trailer:. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us.

Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted.

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Callie cooke

Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short.

As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Making her professional debut when it was at Hampstead Downstairs, Callie Cooke reprises her role as Tia, a vulnerable teenager who has been in care since she was three. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that.

We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Pitched in a fictional Northern town, the play is at its most touching in the exchanges between the deeply harmed and year-old Tia played by Callie Cooke , who has been placed in local authority care since a baby and her friend Katie, who by contrast has at least a loving mum in her life and a background sheltered from ruthless violent abuse. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. In his first venture to the downstairs studio at Hampstead Theatre, Ed Hall has found a remarkable first script from Phil Davies, and cast it with the explosive talent of just-out-of-ArtsEd Callie Cooke. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs.

Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short.

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. This production is well worth seeing. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again.

View Post. Randy came to England on this occasion primarily for work purposes, whereas Dot was in transit, on her way to watch some football World Cup live in Russia. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption.

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Callie cooke

Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Post code. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. This production is well worth seeing. In the event, there were still tickets for this play available and Dot seemed keen to join us. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team.

I glanced at one grizzly point to see if our entourage looked OK and assessed that Randy might be as squeamish as me, whereas Janie and Dot were lapping it up. Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. Here is the trailer:. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends.

Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. The play is basically about a young girl in Rochdale who is befriended and groomed by an older, Asian man with debts and bad friends. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. All of the performers were very good indeed. As for our grub after the show, we had over-catered so successfully for lunch with Kim and Micky the day before — click here — we had plenty of food for a grazing supper…or three. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short.

Yes, come to think of it, both of them most certainly can visit again. This is a very interesting play with a superb cast, very cleverly staged and directed. The central story, a Jewish family business dominated by a matriarch who has brought a lot of attitude with her from the old country, naturally resonated with me. Post code. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans.

Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. All the main papers have given it rave reviews; deservedly so. View Post. All of the performers were very good indeed. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Still, always good to see Ollie.

Not that the Harris family was at war with itself in the manner of the tragi-comic Solomon family of this play, thank goodness. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. All of the performers were very good indeed. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph. Here is the trailer:. You can read all about it here on the Hampstead site, click here, including links to those excellent reviews, sparing me the trouble. Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me.

716 Share

Callie cooke

This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Ed Hall himself directed this one — unusually for a downstairs production — top quality stuff. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. Another visit to the Hampstead upstairs this time , another Ed Hall triumph.

Skip to content Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs. We saw the original version at the Hampstead Downstairs, but it looks as though it was a straight transfer, same cast, same production team. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. This production is well worth seeing. View Post. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email.

Before the show, we had a chance encounter with Ollie Goodwin, who was also at the Hampstead but he was watching the upstairs show…so it proved to be a brief encounter. This production is well worth seeing. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. Still, always good to see Ollie. As the title punningly suggests, a family working with rubber is prone to both physical dirtiness and moral corruption. We were talking about it all weekend; it raised such startling issues and was so well acted. In Filthy Business, a comic epic, playwright Ryan Craig travels back in time to explore the poisonous and reptilian atmosphere of the Solomon family, the owners of a retail rubber business in North East London. All of the performers were very good indeed. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. Janie and I were fascinated by the descriptive rubric about this play, so booked to see it as soon as the tickets went on sale, as oft we do for the Hampstead Downstairs.

Sara Kestelman as the matriarch, Yetta Solomon, was simply superb. Still, always good to see Ollie. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. The official reviews are good but not rave reviews, whereas some of the unofficial noise is unequivocally complimentary. View Post. Here is the trailer:. Here and through the embedded picture below is a link to that rubric and other Hampstead resources about this play and production. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. All of the performers were very good indeed. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email.

The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. Indeed the two girls looked as though they might, had they lived in late 18th century Paris, have sat in the front row of the guillotine execution sessions, knitting. Post code. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that. Grandma Ann: Harris family business matriarch, yes, machinations, no. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. View Post.

The funny bits are mostly very funny; the confrontational bits thrilling and shocking. But Filthy Business makes you think well beyond the family and its business. We saw it on a Friday evening after a poor early evening meal at Harry Morgans. New debut play inspired by the Rochdale child sex scandal is powerful, but also a bit slight and too short. The Yetta Solomon character sees keeping the family together and in the family business to be so important as to override pretty much all other practical and moral imperatives. This was a very harrowing short piece, brilliantly done. Here is the trailer:. I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me.

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I recognised some of the characteristics from my own family — the story Yetta tells from her childhood in the shtetl — of chasing Cossack trouble-makers away with a stick — was almost word for word a story I remember my Grandma Ann telling me. Deservedly, this one got a transfer to Trafalgar Studios, so there is a good stub to be found with the production details, some interviews etc. Anyway, it made a change for me and Janie to go to the theatre with some other people — it is years since we last did that.

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